About

 

What is “nanagu shaale”?

Seven years ago, ‘nanagu shaale’ worked itself into being, for one purpose: The inclusion of children with special needs in education, and something else happened along the way while working to achieve this.

It engaged people and communities, inspired young and old, made them cry and look beyond. It made them want to do something like ferry a child with disabilities to school, create a core group, work on the issues around enrollment of an aspiring student with special needs, write a case, provide support and fix exclusion in the face of society that did not realize it.

With the support of MpahsiS an HP Company, “nanagu shaale” was created by the team at Fourth Wave Foundation with a vision to engage various stakeholders in the process of change.

“nanagu shaale” is about the right to equal access to education and about giving the community the network and tools necessary to spread the word about what children with special needs can do, and with a little encouragement enable them be part of the community.

This model envisages a local school where all belong! And learning is for all.

‘nanagu shaale’ translated into local language, Kannada, means ‘School for me too’.  A community where no child is left behind due to any reason.

 

WHY?

THE NUMBERS SPEAK FOR THEMSELVES

WHAT IS THE NUMBER OF PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES IN INDIA?

7000000

S E V E N  M I L L I O N

AND GUESS HOW MANY ARE EMPLOYED?

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

ONLY ONE OUT OF A HUNDRED.

Why children with special needs/disabilities?

We started out with studying a large claim.
Claims, Claims and Claims about wanting to provide jobs for PWD’s(People with Disabilities) by corporations.

We reached a problem that needed solving: No skilled People with Disabilities.

We did a lot of thinking,researching and talking to smart people.
We came up with quite a surprising answer.

Education.

Not many had access to education. Nearly any saw thorough a schooling process.

Where does the problem rest? Way at the bottom.

Children with special needs/disabilities do not even have access to preschools at age 3, forget gaining jobs at age 18.

Considering that 3% of all funds of all departments in India are set aside for inclusion and bettermentof PWD’s
at every national and state program, if it were used right and reached the very people who could do the most
with it, we would not be here working on this issue.

As long as PWD’s remain invisible, their issues also remain invisible.
The world misses out on a tremendous opportunity for inclusion where it can best impact a community and change attitudes – Schools

 

Why “nanagu shaale”?

“nanagu shaale” strives to help everyone. Everyone includes the community. When you work to enable an excluded child’s life through education, health, safety, and opportunity, these changes have a positive ripple effect and often serves as the influential force to break the cycle of poverty and dependence which would have otherwise been the child’s fate.

As a child with special needs, in a system that is not supportive, “nanagu shaale” strives to bring together various stakeholders in a community to ensure inclusion into schools as first step. These children need information, healthcare, and education. They need laws to change, need parents, government, and the global community to see that they are valuable and any investment in their education will enable a break in the cycle of exclusion with the promise of work opportunities that ensure livelihoods.

The problem is not how to wipe out the differences but how to unite with the differences intact”. – Rabindranath Tagore

 

So, this is how and why “nanagu shaale” came into being. Don’t you want to see what we’ve done?

Click here to view our progress.